Effects of n-Octyl-β-D-Glucopyranoside on Human and Rat Erythrocyte Membrane Stability Against Hemolysis



Cesare Sblano, Silvia Micelli, Daniela Meleleo*
Department Pharmaco- Biology, University of Bari “A. Moro”, via E. Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy.


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© 2010 Sblano et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department Pharmaco- Biology, University of Bari “A. Moro”, via E. Orabona 4, 70126 Bari, Italy; Tel/Fax: +390805442775; E-mail: dmeleleo@farmbiol.uniba.it


Abstract

The practical importance for the pharmaceutical and cosmetics industries of the interactions between biological membranes and surfactant molecules has led to intensive research within this area. The interactions of non-ionic surfactant n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) with the human and rat erythrocyte membranes were studied. The in vitro hemolytic and antihemolytic activities were determined by employing a method in which both erythrocytes were added to the hypotonic medium containing OG at different concentrations, and the amount of haemoglobin released was determined. noctyl- β-D-glucopyranoside was found to have a biphasic effect on both types of erythrocyte membrane. We also investigated the interactions of OG with the erythrocyte membrane in isotonic medium; the dose-dependent curves show similar behaviour in both human and rat erythrocytes. Our results showed that OG has greater antihemolytic potency on rat than on human erythrocytes; furthermore, rat erythrocytes were more sensitive than human erythrocytes to hypotonic shock. How the different lipoprotein structure of these erythrocytes determines a difference in antihemolytic activity is discussed.

Keywords: Antihemolytic potency, hypotonic hemolysis, n-octyl-β-D-glucopyranoside, non-ionic-surfactant.